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Ageing Equally? is a research project focusing on what makes a good place in which to grow older for people who belong to minority communities. Research from the Ambition for Ageing programme has shown us that marginalisation is linked to the risk of social isolation.

 

This programme aims to generate a deeper understanding of what supports wellbeing and what makes places age-friendly for a cross-section of communities of identity or experience within the population of Greater Manchester, in order to prevent social isolation.

 

Organisations selected to deliver Ageing Equally? were asked to target one specfic target group, in one particular ward, neighbourhood or across multiple areas. Vital is their ability to reach and engage with a specific community of identity or experience and being able to work in an inclusive way by acitvely seeking members of the comunity who may have multiple barriers and/or identify with more than one minority group.

 

Aging Equally is made up of up to ten large research projects supported by the central Ambition for Ageing team at GMCVO and five smaller research projects supported by the Equalities Board based at the LGBT Foundation.

 

Do Well Ltd have been selected to assist organisations taking part in Ageing Equally?.

 

Smaller research projects:

 

  • Ethnic Health Forum in Manchester is researching the barriers to accessing services for older people in the Kuwaiti Bedoun community in Central Manchester wards

 

  • Europia in Manchester is researching the assets and skills of Polish people aged 50+ in Greater Manchester

 

  • St George’s Centre in Bolton is researching what makes an age-friendly neighbourhood for older people with long term mental illness who live in the BL1 postcode area

 

  • Visible Outcomes in Salford is researching what makes an age-friendly neighbourhood for refugees and asylum seekers over 50 years old who live in Salford

 

  • Wai Yin in Manchester is researching how Chinese older people, especially disabled people and those who speak different community languages, can grow old and happy

 

Larger research projects:

 

To be announced.